An Important Stretch after Trampoline Training

A common downfall for most amateur athletes and those beginning to incorporate more exercise into their life, is neglecting the importance of stretching after a workout.

In professional trampolining, stretching is more than just cooling down and comforting the muscles. It’s a crucial step in training the body to position and take off correctly, and to maintain good form and posture.

Why Stretch After Trampoline Training?

You just put in all that effort and time into trampoline training, so why do you have to spend more time stretching after you’re done? When you work out, lactic acid accumulates in your muscles, which causes the fatigue and soreness commonly experienced afterward. A proper stretch will warm your muscles and increase blood circulation to reduce soreness. It also helps increase flexibility and improve your range of motion.

Post-Training Shoulder Stretches

The shoulders are a problem area for many athletes. Gymnasts often find that focusing on interior core movements causes rounded shoulders, neglecting the posterior. This can limit the range of motion in the shoulder area which can lead to injury and general physical limitations. By stretching after trampoline training, you can open up the posterior movement to get the full range of motion you need from your shoulders.

This simple stretch used by professional trampoline coach Greg Roe can help to maintain or improve shoulder motion after trampoline training.

Step 1
Lay on the ground with a padded cylinder. The cylinder should be placed under the body right at the shoulder joint. The back should be straight, and the arms should be raised over the head. The cylinder must be properly placed for this stretch to work.

Step 2
Place an object on top of the hands with a spotter applying light pressure to brace the arms while stretching. The arms should be completely straight with no bends in the elbows. The upper arm should ideally be positioned right by the ears, so the body forms a plank.

Step 3
Using the core, suck the stomach in and lift the rear up to straighten the plank. The stretching should occur right in the shoulders and not in the lower torso. Hold the position for approximately 30 to 60 seconds. Roe describes doing 4 sets to start really building flexibility.

Always Stretch after Jumping

You should have a warm-up routine in place before you jump, but that routine should not include this stretch. This stretch is intended for after the workout only because it may leave your arms feeling too loose and weak for effective trampoline training.

It is recommended this stretch is performed under the supervision of a professional trainer.

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